Wilder Kaiser

2 adults
  • 1 adult
  • 2 adults
  • Family & more

1. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer

2. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer

3. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer

Advice & technique

Advice for tour planning and the right technique

Precise preparation is indispensable to fully enjoy your climbing day or holiday. The right choice of difficulty of the climbing route, precise tour planning and the right equipment as well as consideration of safety aspects on site are essential for a safe climbing tour with rich experiences.

Tour planning

Comprehensive information on:

  • Weather forecast and the current situation (snow, ice, wetness, …)
  • Route offer
  • Difficulties
  • Securing
  • Rock properties
  • Exposure
  • Entrance and exit
  • Parking
Always choose your routes and climbing facilities with a view to your own skills and those of your partner. Print out the right topographical map in advance and take it along for climbing.

Equipment

  • Climbing harness
  • Securing equipment both partners are familiar with
  • 10 - 15 express slings (depending on terrain)
  • At least 1 band sling per person
  • At least 3 closure snap hooks
  • Climbing helmet
  • Climbing rope, with a length suitable for the climbing facility/garden
  • Climbing shoes
  • Magnesium and bag
  • Small first-aid kit
  • Mobile phone (charged!)
  • Enough fluids
  • Food
  • Rain protection
  • Sun protection

Advice & notes

  • A rope bag protects the rope and extends its service life.
  • Flip-flops or similar are practical for climbing breaks.
  • Tape can be helpful at smaller skin tears.
  • Mark the halfway point of your rope to avoid having too little rope left for roping down.

Safety check

General sports climbing recommendations of the Alpenverein: 1. Partner check before each start! Check mutually: Belt closures, roping knot, roping point, snap-hook closure, securing equipment and whether the rope-end is knotted off. 2. Full attention when securing! Securing is high-precision work! All of your attention must be on the climber and partner securing. Do not let the rope go slack! Choose the right place to stand. 3. Properly operate the securing equipment! Make yourself familiar with your securing equipment and observe the "braking hand principle": One hand is always closed around the braking rope. 4. Clear communication! Agree on communication rules before starting your climb. Inform your partner before you hang on the rope. 5. Properly attach the interim securing! Attach all interim securing from a position that is as stable as possible - not overstretched. Observe the proper rope course. 6. No top rope from a single snap hook! The top rope anchor must have two independent securing points. The rope must be attached to at least two snap hooks. 7. Keep the falling space clear! Do not climb on top of each other! Observe free falling space on the ground and at the wall. Attention at swinging falls. 8. Caution when lowering down & roping down! Never rope on rope – only lower down via deflections of metal! Lower down your partner slowly and evenly. When roping down, knot the rope ends and use the fall protection (Kurzprusik). 9. Protect head & body! A helmet protects you from head injury at falls and rock fall! The helmet is standard equipment for alpine climbing tours. Warming up before climbing protects your joints, tendons and muscles. 10. Boulder safely! Observe a safe jump-off area. Active spotting and a crash pad may prevent injury. © 2013 Oesterreichischer Alpenverein

Classification of difficulties

UIAA-scale France USA AUS Great Britain
Adjectival Tech
1 1 5.2
2 2 5.3 11
3 3 5.4 12
4 4 5.5 VD 4a
5- 5a 5.6 13
5 5.7 14 HS 4b
5+ 5b 15 4c
6- 5.8 16 VS
6 5c 5.9 17 HVS 5a
6+ 6a 5.10a 18 E1
7- 6a+ 5.10b 19 5b
7 6b 5.10c 20 E2
7+ 6b+ 5.10d 21 5c
7+/8- 6c 5.11a 22 E3
8- 6c+ 5.11b 23
8 7a 5.11c 24 E4 6a
8+ 7a+ 5.11d 25 E5
8+/9- 7b 5.12a 26 6b
9- 7b+ 5.12b E6
9 7c 5.12c 27 6c
9+ 7c+ 5.12d 28 E7
9+/10- 8a 5.13a 29
5.13b 7a
10- 8a+ 5.13c 30 E8
10 8b 5.13d 31
10+ 8b+ 5.14a 32 7b
10+/11- 8c 5.14b E9
11- 8c+ 5.14c 33 7c
11 9a 5.14d
11+ 9a+ 5.14a
11+/12- 9b 5.15b

Classification of severity

E1 Drilled-in route secured similar to sports climbing
with short hook distances
E2 Above-averagely secured route
Good material present, only few own securing points needed, partially larger hook distances
E3 Averagely secured Route
Additional securing necessary, but still relatively easy
E4 Alpine, badly secured route
You need to ensure your own securing even in difficult places.
E5 Hard to secure route
The route is badly secured and partially cannot be secured or can only be secured with difficulty. Long run-outs must be mastered.
E6 Very severe route
With extended passages that cannot be secured even in difficult rope lengths. Falls in critical locations will have fatal consequences.

Did you know?

About 50% of all climbers start their sport on an artificial wall instead of in the rock. However, rock climbing requires more demanding securing techniques and there are risks that a climbing hall will hardly offer. Climbing is not the same as climbing – Due to this, Climbers Paradise has decided to produce a climbing technique video series that permits safe passage from the climbing hall to the rock. Angy Eiter, four-fold world champion, and Mike Gabl, the technical leader of Climbers Paradise, will tell you what to observe when climbing in the rock in their videos.

The following subjects are covered in the video sequences:

  • Correct warm-up
  • Stepping and gripping
  • Pull phase
  • Motion sequence: controlledly static or fluidly dynamic
  • Toe hooks and heel hooks
  • Presentation of securing equipment
  • Fall/dynamic securing behaviour
  • Objective dangers and risks that will hardly occur in the hall
  • 'Hard facts' in the climbing garden (rock quality, wall structure, hook quality, etc.)
  • Securing and falling behaviour in the rock wall
  • New rope technique 'Re-threading at the deflection point' (Swiss and French method)
This climbing technique video series is targeted at beginners who have practiced in the hall and want to try their first steps on the rock, as well as to experienced climbers who want to update their know-how.

Notfall-App

Notfall-App
Notfall-App

Für Apple und Android steht Smartphone-Benutzern die Notfall-App der Bergrettung Tirol und Leitstelle Tirol zum Download zur Verfügung.

Climbers Paradise App

Climbers Paradise App
Climbers Paradise App

Die neu entwickelte Climbers-Paradise-App powered by Chillaz bietet versierten Kletterern, Boulder-Freaks sowie Plaisir-Junkies und Klettersteigbegeisterten umfangreiche Informationen zu allen Hot Spots im Kletterdorado Tirol.

2 adults
  • 1 adult
  • 2 adults
  • Family & more

1. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer

2. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer

3. Room

1. Child

2. Child

3. Child

4. Child

5. Child

6. Child

At the timeof arrival

Zimmer